100 Years of Now Library

Bibliothek 100 Jahre Gegenwart

Bibliothek 100 Jahre Gegenwart

The present rules, encroaching upon the entire period of time at our disposal. Under the pressure of the present, contemporary thinking often lacks both an historical awareness and a future horizon. The book series 100 Years of Now Library aims to confront this traditional understanding of the present with other concepts of time.

Each volume covers the time span of a century in order to examine historic upheavals in politics, economics, spirituality, technology and culture that characterize both the present and and the future. They thereby identify transformations for which alternative endings were conceivable and reveal continuities.

The series re-addresses core issues of the past hundred years: the housing question, the ongoing relevance of the artistic avant-gardes, the correlations between war and technology, the influence of historical feminist and anarchist movements, questions of political classification systems, disturbances in the metabolism of the planet, data production and cybernetics and, not least, notions of history and of time itself. Where were potentials left undeveloped, where were questions left unanswered and where does history offer alternatives? How can the past be instilled in the present not as a relic, but as lived experience and a resource for the future?

The volumes of the 100 Years of Now Library, published by Matthes & Seitz in Berlin, penetrate deep into the paradigms of our age to showcase new ways of appraising current issues. They reflect the program of events of the four-year project 100 Years of Now 2015 – 2019 and will conclude with the Dictionary of Now.

Die Zeit der Algorithmen

Die Zeit der Algorithmen

Die Zeit der Algorithmen

Volume 1, November 2016, in German
Edited by Bernd Scherer

How did we develop this fixation on a present that removes us from the course of time and thereby from established systems of meaning? In the introductory volume, Bernd Scherer, director of HKW, and Helga Nowotny, professor emeritus of academic research at the ETH Zürich, examine how notions of time evolved between capitalism, armed conflicts and technological progress, how time is experienced today, what that means for experiencing and shaping our own age and what outlets there may be from the raster of acceleration and timing demanded by algorithms.

Wohnungsfrage

Wohnungsfrage

Wohnungsfrage

Volume 2, February 2017, in German
Edited by Jesko Fezer, Nikolaus Hirsch, Wilfried Kuehn and Hila Peleg

Housing shortages, gentrification, luxury renovations, refugee housing – after decades characterized by a supposedly self-regulated market, the housing issue is back as a sociopolitical matter. How do we want to live in the future, what should our cities look like? An analysis of the historical topoi that still determine housing to this day: inequality, neighborhood, migration, living, and working. And the demand for a new housing policy.

Krieg singen

Krieg singen

Krieg singen

Volume 3, February 2017, in German
Edited by Detlef Diederichsen and Holger Schulze

Why do war and music go so well together? Music plays a decisive role in war propaganda and warmongering, and – most recently – in the soundtracks of beastly execution videos. On the other side, much of music promotes peace and non-violence, as well as something akin to musical mourning. The publication compiles theoretical reflections, written collages and interviews on the connections between war, technology, and music.

Nervöse Systeme

Nervöse Systeme

Nervöse Systeme

Volume 4, February 2017, in German
Edited by Anselm Franke, Stephanie Hankey and Marek Tuszynski

Today, the nervous system has become the leitmotiv of an increasingly nervous, technologically highly equipped age. Companies talk about “smart nerves” and “synaptic real-time connections” as organizational solutions for almost any problem, whether in apparatuses of the state, economy or ecology. The volume examines how the new trust in technological solutions and databased algorithms, supported by data analysis, reality mining, pattern recognition and forecasts, has changed our understanding of the “self” and the “social.” It frames the examination of data in social and political strategies of the past hundred years.

Pop 16

Pop 16

Pop 16
100 Jahre produzierte Musik

Volume 5, released February 2017, in German
Edited by Detlef Diederichsen and Florian Sievers

Similar to the way that photography captured light, wax cylinders and shellac records were the first to capture the sounds of their age one hundred years ago. It was a step that would have far-reaching consequences. It not only would change how people listened to music, but also had an effect on the music itself. How did the first produced, deliberately tonally designed recordings shape listening habits? How did the recording media, which began to traverse the world without human accompaniment, transform entire musical styles? Based on the technological innovations of approximately one hundred years ago, the volume explores the genres, aesthetics and social categories that emerged from this, some of which are still valid today.

2 oder 3 Tiger

2 oder 3 Tiger

2 oder 3 Tiger
Koloniale Geschichten, Medien und Moderne

Volume 6, released October 2017
Edited by Anselm Franke

Based on the exhibition of the same name, the volume compiles essays by leading East Asian intellectuals. The tiger is the basis for reflection on modernization ideologies and the way that culture and life are altered under the prevailing circumstances and identities are destabilized or solidified. Modernity is reflected as a colonial scheme that is inscribed in the history of nation states, militarization and financialization, but also as a comprehensive new order of the world and worldviews that in the past 200 years has led to a profound crisis of consciousness in most societies.

Utopie und Feminismus

Utopie und Feminismus

Utopie und Feminismus

Volume 7, released October 2017
Edited by Annemie Vanackere and Sarah Reimann

The Russian Revolution created the most progressive, completely gender-neutral marriage and family legislation the modern world had ever seen. Homosexuality, the endorsement of which is punishable in today’s Russia, was legalized in Russia in 1918. The beginnings of the Russian Revolution were not only ahead of their own time, but also ahead of ours. Its ideals, as its reality, are not only once again contemporary, but also still visionary. This volume, created together with the theater HAU Hebbel am Ufer, is devoted to the transformation of historical utopias of equality over the last hundred years, starting with the writings of the feminist author Alexandra Kollontai and the productions of female artists invited to contribute by HAU Hebbel am Ufer.

Schools of Tomorrow

Schools of Tomorrow

Schools of Tomorrow

Volume 8, released March 2018
Edited by Silvia Fehrmann

One school reform is followed by another, exhausting teachers and parents alike. The educational system is being readied for a future driven by business interests, a future to which, however, only a few are looking forward. One hundred years ago, by contrast, educational reformers across the globe strove to create opportunities for new ways of acting and thinking. The volume examines how the experimental practices of the past can be applied to today’s learning under digital conditions. How can schools become places where alternative designs of the future are created?

Die Jetztzeit der Monster

Die Jetztzeit der Monster

Die Jetztzeit der Monster

Volume 9, released March 2018
Edited by Katrin Klingan, Nanna Heidenreich and Rana Dasgupta

The twentieth century, which set out aspirations to overcome the great questions of inequality, poverty and colonialism, was set back at square one: “It is the time of the monsters,” to quote a much used reference entry from Gramsci’s prison diaries after the First World War. Our present is defined by the dissolution of existing orders, while at the same time they have inscribed themselves deeply in our thoughts and actions. One of these is that of the nation-state, whose structures determine rights and deprivations, inclusion and exclusion, society and subjectivation. The volume surveys the classification system of the nation-state, examines how its mechanisms shape the present world order and encourages us to look beyond its limits.

Kosmismus

Kosmismus

Kosmismus

Volume 10, released March 2018
Edited by Boris Groys and Anton Vidokle

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Russian Cosmists aimed to make humanity immortal through technology, thereby redeeming the Christian promise of resurrection in the here and now. The arts played a central role in these endeavors. Because of their ability to perpetuate things, they were regarded as equal in stature to the natural sciences and medicine. Based on historical Cosmism, this volume examines materialism as the central mode of thought of the 20th century against the backdrop of new philosophical trends like speculative realism, new materialism and transhumanism. Its utopian potential is explored by following in the footsteps of successive generations of artists who have been influenced by Cosmism since the historical avant-garde.

Technosphäre

Technosphäre

Technosphäre

Volume 11, released October 2018
Edited by Katrin Klingan and Christoph Rosol

What happens when technologies and techniques become planetary players? Over the course of the twentieth century, a new component of the global system established itself: the technosphere, comparable in its effects and function with the biosphere or the hydrosphere. The concurrence of natural environments with technical infrastructures and the almost uncontrollable evolutionary dynamics of growing “technological biodiversity” raise new questions about the initiation and operation of technical omniscience: How do the edges of what life is shift? What autonomies does technology possess? What latitudes are opened or closed with the new world order?

Wörterbuch der Gegenwart

Wörterbuch der Gegenwart

Wörterbuch der Gegenwart

Volumes 12 to 14, released January 2019 (in three volumes)
Edited by Bernd Scherer, Olga von Schubert and Stefan Aue

Language is not only capable of depicting reality, but also of shaping it. Words and what they signify are always part of historical negotiation processes and express a specific perspective of the world. How can we communicate our globalized present when words and their meanings are essentially characterized by the continuity of historical interpretive patterns? Using the example of the twelve words words Language, Time, Truth, Body, Animal, Thing, Violence, Fear, Market, Image, Forum and Justice, the Dictionary of Now aims to oppose universalistic linguistic fixations of modernity with specific positions of the present. In this pluralization of temporal and spatial conceptual contexts, not only local and historical gender- and class-specific imprints and their power-political interconnections become visible. The potential for shifts in meaning and new attitudes also arise.